Book to land ahead of 75th anniversary

OUR HISTORY: Historian Mike Reed AM and Katherine Museum curator Simmone Croft are proud to have 'Fall of the Daisy Cutters' published. Picture: Supplied

OUR HISTORY: Historian Mike Reed AM and Katherine Museum curator Simmone Croft are proud to have 'Fall of the Daisy Cutters' published. Picture: Supplied

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The first book detailing the bombing of Katherine and its impact in the region will be launched after more than a year of extensive research. 

Fall of the Daisy Cutters, a collaborative work between historian Mike Reed AM and Katherine Museum curator Simmone Croft, has been printed and is ready for its official launch in early March. 

The book explores for the first time the in-depth history of the event, including how it shaped the future of Katherine post-war. 

“The war had a major impact on Katherine’s economy and infrastructure growth,” Ms Croft said.

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“The book details what happened on the day, but also explores Katherine pre and post war and how it shaped the town.”

Katherine was at the heart of the Second World War with significant war infrastructure, the main army intelligence, the largest army tent hospital and a significant amount of troops, making it a target.

At 12.20pm on March 22, 1942, nine Mitsubishi G4M1 "Betty" bombers of the Japanese Navy's Tokao Kokutai, 23rd Koku Sentai appeared over Katherine  and circled the area. They then disappeared only to return 15 minutes later to drop an estimated 91, 60kg bombs.

Of that, 84 fell on the main target, the Katherine Aerodrome.

The book is dedicated in memory of Dodger Kodjalwal, an aboriginal man who was killed in the event. 

The Katherine Museum and the Returned Services League (RSL) will come together on March 22 – the 75th anniversary of the bombing – to host a commemorative event on the museum grounds. 

The community are invited to attend the event. 

The Katherine Museum is also working towards the completion of its What a Woman publication celebrating women in the NT. 

Ms Croft and author Toni Tapp Coutts have had an overwhelming response to the project that its launch has been postponed. 

“We’ve now got 56 stories of local women; it is taking some time to complete the proofing and editing,” Ms Croft said. 

To find out more details about the book launches and commemorative events, following Katherine Museum on Facebook.