A survey is inviting Indigenous women to speak honestly

HONOURING WOMEN: Djilpin Dancers of Beswick performed the White Cockatoo dance in Katherine on Saturday.
HONOURING WOMEN: Djilpin Dancers of Beswick performed the White Cockatoo dance in Katherine on Saturday.

A new online survey is asking Indigenous women what is important to them. 

Social justice commissioner and Indigenous rights activist June Oscar AO has launched the survey to coincide with the start of NAIDOC Week, with the theme Because of Her We Can.

The Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices) project will inform a report to the Federal Government about what is important to Indigenous women. 

“This year’s NAIDOC Week has rightly put the focus on our women as a time to reflect on our strength and resilience as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and celebrate our achievements,” commissioner Oscar said.

For the past five months, commissioner Oscar and her team have been travelling the country to listen to women and girls about their strengths, priorities, aspirations, needs and challenges.

“Unfortunately, we are not going to be able to visit every community across the country, so we’ve created another opportunity for women and girls to have their say.”

The survey results, along with information gathered during national conversations, will inform commissioner Oscar’s report to the Federal Government.

I want the report to say this is who we are, this is what we’re made of and this is what we want changed to have equality of life in this country

Social justice commissioner and Indigenous rights activist June Oscar AO

“In the spirit of self-determination and a human rights based approach, this project will hear and honour the voices of Indigenous women and girls.  

“We want our report to come from a position of strength, because we are strong women.”

It has been 32 years since the first national consultations with Indigenous women by the Aboriginal Women’s Taskforce and the Department of Aboriginal Affairs in 1986.

“We stand on the shoulders of all those strong women involved in the Women’s Business report, including Phyllis Daylight and Mary Johnstone. Along with so many of our women leaders, they were persistent, loud and proud and worked tirelessly to bring about change.”

Commissioner Oscar said the Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices) project will inform the government about what’s important to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

“I encourage women and girls to do the survey, and speak from the heart and speak honestly. Your input is critical if we’re to deliver a report that’s true to your lived realities.”

“I want the report to say this is who we are, this is what we’re made of and this is what we want changed to have equality of life in this country,” commissioner Oscar said.

Check out what is happening for NAIDOC week in Katherine:

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